Couple with Cerebral Palsy Enjoy Parenthood

After being told that they likely wouldn't be able to bring their baby home from the hospital, these new parents are able to celebrate the joys of life as a trio

Screenshot from Toronto Star report

We’re a little teary over this story from the Toronto Star about a couple who nearly lost their baby because of their perceived disabilities. Maricyl Palisoc and Charles Wilton welcomed wee son William in April, but for three months before the birth until weeks after the baby’s arrival, they had to contend with the threat that their baby might be taken away from them.

Palisoc and Wilton live with cerebral palsy, a condition that affects movement, motor skills and speech. It has no impact on their mental capacities, but the Peel Children’s Aid Society had concerns that the new parents couldn’t care for their newborn. Three weeks after little William arrived, Peel CAS dropped the case when Palisoc and Wilton proved to be capable parents.

Occupational therapists have helped the couple find ways to handle everyday tasks like changing William’s diaper and breastfeeding. The parents work as a team—when one needs help, the other is ready to step in.

Additional support is sometimes needed, like when they want to bathe William. The couple live in an assisted-living building that provides 24-hour access to staff who come by regularly to check on the family.

Palisoc and Wilton aren’t worried about the future and how they will care for William once he gets older. Wilton is a retired Paralympian for Canada and promises that he is used to challenges.

“We are typical, normal parents. We worry about the same things. Whatever happens, happens. We will deal with it then,” Wilton says. The couple plans to wed next June.

Check out the full story (plus an adorable video of the young family) here.

Can you relate to this couple’s story? Tell us about your experience.

Close

Unsubscribe at any time.
More in Parents, Relationships
13 Summer Beauty Essentials
13 Summer Beauty Essentials

Close